British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

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Woody
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British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Woody » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:20 pm

Launched This Day 11/9/1911 by Napier & Miller Ltd, Clydebank, Old Kilpatrick, Yard No 236

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/v ... p?id=23032
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British Monarch 1922-9-11.jpg
British Monarch

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Voyager
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Voyager » Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:14 pm

Here is a model that I built of British Monarch some years ago. 25'=1" I hadn't got an image at the time and based the colour scheme on Caledonian Monarch. There was no funnel cowl on the plan, but the rest of it seems OK.
Bob
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British Monarch

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davidwat
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by davidwat » Wed Sep 11, 2013 9:33 pm

Sunk with all hands on 19th June 1940, while carrying an ore cargo from North Africa to the UK.
david watson

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Voyager
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Voyager » Thu Sep 12, 2013 7:30 am

That was the 1923 British Monarch that was torpedoed! The 1913 one (model) was sunk by a mine en-route from Hull towards Genoa in 1917. Maybe the image above was the 1923 version! But the model was built using the 1913 Napier & Miller plans!
Bob

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riverman
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by riverman » Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:08 am

I have a British Monarch, 5749 grt. (Raeburn & Verel) Built 1913, Napier & Miller.
4.8.1917: Struck mine and sunk in the Mediterranean 2 miles S.S.W. from Ile de Porquerolles Lighthouse laid by the German submarine U 72 whilst on a voyage from Hull for Genoa with a cargo of coal.
Source: 'British Merchant Ships sunk by U-Boats in the 1914-1918 War, by A.J. Tennent.
paul hunter

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Woody
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Woody » Thu Sep 12, 2013 9:41 am

The question is were they similar ships or have I posted the wrong image

Voyager can we use the image of your model in the new database?

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Voyager
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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Voyager » Thu Sep 12, 2013 10:54 am

Hi Woody,
I was wondering that. The only difference I can see is the cowl top to the funnel in the image photograph. Yes, go ahead and use the image as you wish! What database are you referring to? Clydesite or Clyde Maritime (OK either way with me).
Bob

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Re: British Monarch SS 1922 - Napier & Miller Ltd

Post by Voyager » Thu Sep 12, 2013 11:06 am

Here are my notes made on the British Monarch. I wrote them on the 18th March, 2005.
General Details:
Year built: 1913
Original name: BRITISH MONARCH
Built by: Napier & Miller, Old Kilpatrick, Glasgow
Owners: Raeburn & Verel, Glasgow
Type: Three island tramp steamer
Tonnage: 6,000 gross
Engines: Triple expansion steam
Service speed: Not known
Dimensions: Length 420ft Breadth 54ft Depth 31ft 6in

The BRITISH MONARCH was a very good example of the three-island tramp steamer. Similar vessels were produced in great numbers during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The ship was powered by a triple-expansion engines with cylinders of 27 inches, 44 inches and 48 inches and a stroke of 48 inches. Two eighteen foot diameter boilers were provided and a large donkey boiler fitted with Howden’s forced draught system. Water ballast could be pumped at the rate of 250 tons per hour.
Although the ship was fitted with electric lighting, oil lamps were also provided in case of breakdown of the electrical supply.
An Alley and McLellan’s steering engine was fitted within the after end of the midship island. Cargo handling gear consisted of ten steam winches and a combination of tubular steel and pitch pine derricks. The heaviest steel derrick having a S.W.L. of 20 tons. The smaller steel derricks are 6 ton S.W.L. and the wooden ones four tons. Cargo capacity was 9,300 tons.
When the ship was reviewed in 1913 it was stated that the accommodation for officers and crew was “exceptionally spacious and comfortable!” For the crew, this spacious comfort amounted to forecastle accommodation with a composition deck. The port half housing ten seamen and the starboard half ten firemen. The bosun and lamp trimmer shared a double berth at the after end of the port forecastle and two leading stokers shared a double berth cabin on the starboard side.
The ship had an open bridge, but a small enclosed wheelhouse. Directly below was the captain’s cabin which comprised of a single room opening into the chartroom. Below this were three double berth spare staterooms, the officers dining saloon and a double berth cabin for the chief steward and cabin boy. The deck officers lived in the accommodation block aft of the funnel. The three deck officers had single berth cabins on the port side and the four engineers had similar cabins on the starboard side. The carpenter and boy shared a double berth cabin on the port side. The six apprentices lived in two small cabins at the after end between the deck and engineering officers. They had no portholes or windows, but a skylight opening onto the boat deck. Access to all officer cabins was straight out on to the deck. Two Chinese cooks shared a double berth cabin in the poop deck. A small four-berth hospital was also contained in the poop. All the officers cabins were “handsomely furnished and finished in finely polished woodwork!” The cabins of the chief officer and chief engineer were each about nine feet square. The only luxury their rank provided was the addition of a washbasin!
By today’s standards, this may seem rather cramped and uncomfortable. But at the same time it was weather-proof, dry and warm with heating stoves being provided in the forecastle. Compared with conditions prevailing in sailing ships at that time, to say nothing of the discomforts of large Atlantic liners, the BRITISH MONARCH was indeed a comfortable ship.
Sadly, she did not have a long life. World War I broke out when the BRITISH MONARCH had only enjoyed one year of peaceful trading. On August 4th, 1917, the ship struck a mine two miles sou’ sou’ west from Porquerolles Light off the Mediterranean coast of France. Fortunately, no lives were lost in the sinking.

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